Interview with Elisha Neubauer


Interview with Elisha Neubauer #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_Authors


What genre do you write and why?
My published work is a children’s picture book. However, my preferred genre is Dark Fantasy – which I am currently working on now. It is scheduled to be out in 2016.

Tell us about your latest book.


My most recent publication is a children’s picture book called Mr. Edmund Goat and the Elusive Clover. It is based on a real life situation that occurred to one of my daughter’s goats on our family farm. The illustrations are stunning – all hand painted and detailed.


What marketing methods are you using to promote your book? 

Facebook readers groups, through the use of the hashtag movement #indiebooksbeseen, and through book blog interviews across the web.


What formats is the book available in?

Interview with Elisha Neubauer #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_Authors
Print and Ebook currently.  It can be found on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, ebookmall.com, europeangeeks.com, and several other retailers.


Who are your favourite authors?

Alex Marwood, award winning author of The Wicked Girls and The Killer Next Door. Alastair Swinnerton, author of The Multiverse of Max Tovey. Ian Thomas Malone, author of The Dialogues Series, Branden Johnson, author of Heaven’s Forgotten, and Jessica Marie Baumgartner, author of By the Stars. I’m also a huge fan of Philippa Gregory.


What advice do you have for other writers?

Don’t get stuck. I know it sounds silly, but it’s true. I recently wrote an article about how we, as authors, tend to get stuck in routine. The largest tool an author can have is experience. Experiences make your writing believable, give you varied sources to draw from. If you’re stuck in a monotonous routine, you’re likely to translate that into your writing. Sometimes you need to just walk away from the pen and paper, the keyboard, and get out there – do some living.


What's your favourite quote about writing/for writers?

“Fiction is the truth inside the lie.” 



What's the best thing about being a writer?

The accomplishment. When you’ve poured your heart and soul into a piece of work, when you’ve created entire worlds – full of people, problems, and emotion – finishing that final sentence gives you a feeling of accomplishment that you can’t find anywhere else in life.


Where can people find out more about you and your writing?

You can find me on my personal blog/website, www.elishaneubauerbooks.weebly.com or on my publishing house’s website, www.europeangeeks.com.


Who is you favorite character in your book and why?
In my published work, my favorite character is Mr. Edmund Goat. He’s based on a real life goat here on my farm, and he’s one of my favorite animals. He’s goofy and always getting into trouble. 



Why do you think readers are going to enjoy your book?
The illustrations alone make Mr. Edmund Goat and the Elusive Clover worth the read. Children respond to the characters and sympathize with their sweet little faces. Of course, for parents, the book tells a beautiful story with a good, old fashioned moral.


How long did it take you to write your book?
Mr. Edmund Goat and the Elusive Clover took approximately six months between my writing and editing the storyline and the illustrator hand painting each individual picture. RED has been in progress for approximately a year now, as I’ve been busy developing European Geeks Publishing in the meantime.


Who designed the cover?
I have a fantastic illustrator who I met during my stint in retail. She’s also a close friend and does my cover art for my publishing company – her name is Alyssa Savary. You can find her on www.europeangeeks.com too.


Interview with Elisha Neubauer #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_AuthorsDid you learn anything from writing your book that was unexpected? 
That it’s not as easy as you would think it is to write a children’s book!


Where can a reader purchase your book?
Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, ebookmall, Apple iBook, europeangeeks.com, and other major retailers.

                                                      
What are you doing to market the book?  
Currently, we advertise it on Facebook & Twitter, but will begin a bigger push for the book early next year – organizing book signings and events in Central Florida.


Who inspires you? 
Joss Whedon and Stephen Moffat. I could only dream of creating a universe as spectacular as Buffy the Vampier Slayer or the recent Doctor Who/Sherlock episodes.


How do you research your books?
Mr. Edmund Goat and the Elusive Clover didn’t really require much research, as I lived with the characters. However, RED brings many ancient Gaelic/Pagan folklore to life, and I spent many, many hours researching online and at the library – as well as my memories from living in the UK as a child.

What is your work in progress? Tell us about it.
My work in progress is a dark fantasy novel currently entitled RED. It blends together Gaelic mythology and Grimm’s Fairy Tales, giving a darker edge to the old stories. RED follows the story of Roslyn Embers, a small town orphan who discovers a family secret that will alter her life drastically when she reaches the age of 25. Everything Roslyn knew about her life, her family, and her world shatters at her feet when she realizes she isn’t actually an orphan, let alone mortal.



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The Best Websites for Writers 2015

The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors

Drum roll please...

You voted for your favourite websites for writers from this year, and gave some great suggestions for sites that support writers, and offer advice about writing, and/or book marketing.

And the winners are....


The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors @KristenLambTX @Writers_Authors


The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors @WritersDigest @Writers_Authors


The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors @ShesNovel @Writers_Authors


The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors @WriterUnboxed @Writers_Authors


The Best Websites for Writers 2015 #Writers #Authors @copyblogger @Writers_Authors
Also voted for were my websites www.JoLinsdell.com and my website for the annual Promo Day event I organise (this website is currently not available as I'm reorganising things for this years event). 

Thank you to everyone who nominated their favourite websites for writers, and to everyone for your continued support of the Writers and Authors website this year.


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Interview with Ian Thomas Malone


Interview with Ian Thomas Malone #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_Authors


What genre do you write?
Mainly philosophy and contemporary fiction with a metaphysical spin.

Tell us about your latest book.
Five College Dialogues and Five More College Dialogues have been re-released! Both are comedic resources for students that carry plenty of appeal for alumni.

What marketing methods are you using to promote your book? 
I have a large social media following and run a few blogs. All of those links can be found on my main site, ianthomasmalone.com

What formats is the book available in?
Ebook and print.

Who are your favourite authors?
Kurt Vonnegut, William Faulkner, Oscar Wilde, George R.R. Martin, and Philip K. Dick.

Interview with Ian Thomas Malone #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_AuthorsWhat advice do you have for other writers?
Read. Perseverance is everything. Writing itself isn’t the hard part. It’s consistently showing up day in and day out that wears on you.

What's your favourite quote about writing/for writers?
This isn’t really about writing, but the “Do it, make your dreams come true,” Shia LaBeouf video is my go to for motivation.

What's the best thing about being a writer?
The pay! Just kidding. I like being able to build and create stories that people enjoy. I’ve been doing this for a few years now and I still get the same warm fuzzy feeling when someone tells me how much they’ve enjoyed my work.

Where can people find out more about you and your writing?
On my website, ianthomasmalone.com! There are tons of pop culture articles and other fun stuff that I like to fill my niche on the internet with.

Who is you favourite character in your book and why? 
The main character in both, George Tecce, who also goes by The Chief. He offers plenty of advice to his students, but he’s far from a perfect person.

Why do you think readers are going to enjoy your book?
It’s different, especially The Dialogues books. The flow is fast and the format is very unique. A contemporary read unlike any other.

How long did it take you to write your book?
I tend to write my first drafts fairly quickly, but the editing process does take some time.

Who designed the cover?
Alyssa Savery. She did a wonderful job.

Interview with Ian Thomas Malone #AuthorInterview #Books @JoLinsdell @Writers_AuthorsDid you learn anything from writing your book that was unexpected? 
Writing in Socratic dialogue was certainly a unique experience. I loved it and felt that it helped improve my ability to write dialogue on a larger scale.

Where can a reader purchase your book?                                                      
Wherever books are sold!

Who inspires you?
Innovators. It doesn’t matter what field. Life’s too short to not be doing something different.

How do you research your books? 
I read tons of philosophy. Being relatively fresh out of college helped as well.

What is your work in progress? Tell us about it.
The Princess and the Clown. It’s a satirical erotic novella. Quite different from The Dialogues.

What are your thoughts on self-publishing verses traditional publishing?
It’s all about the editing. A self-published author needs to work harder to get quality editing, but that’s the only factor I care about. I know lots of authors who put great care into their editing, who traditionally publish and self-publish and plenty who don’t.

Who or what inspired you to become a writer? 
It’s just always been something I’ve done, from a ridiculously early age. I love storytelling.

Does your family support you in your writing career? How? 
My family is very supportive. Word of mouth promotion is huge.

What are you currently reading?
Light in August by William Faulkner. It’s for grad school.

When you’re not writing, how do you spend your time?
I’m in grad school so I don’t have much free time. I’m a huge baseball fan, so I’ve enjoyed watching the playoffs. I also play water polo and love just about anything associated with pools/water.



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Christmas Wish List: Book Ideas for All!

Christmas Wish List: Book Ideas for All! #Books #ToRead @Writers_Authors @JoLinsdell


It's holiday season and books are gifts that keep on giving. Stuck for ideas of what to give this year? Check out these titles from the Writers and Authors bookstore:

For Writers and Authors





Contemporary fiction




Epic Fantasy




Mystery, Thriller, Suspense





Romance




Children's Books




Teen and Young Adult




For more book ideas check out the Writers and Authors Bookstore.


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Excerpt: Dreaming of America: A Journey of Betrayal by Glenis Stott

Title: Dreaming of America: A Journey of Betrayal (based on a true story)
Author: Glenis Stott

Excerpt: Dreaming of America: A Journey of Betrayal by Glenis Stott


Excerpt:

'Will you be seeing him again?'
'He's coming to collect my money next Tuesday.' Clara was trying not to think about it.
'And then will you be paid up?'
'No, I owe him five shillings. That's another ten weeks.'
'Do you want to keep seeing him for ten weeks?'
The overworked, unhappy Clara wanted to keep on seeing him for the next ten weeks, wanted to keep on seeing him forever, but the sensible, moral Clara knew that she shouldn't, that this thing should stop.
'Not really.'
'Could you pay him up? Have you got the money? Or maybe ask Walter for an extra sixpence each week and pay him up in five weeks. Walter wouldn't mind, would he? You could tell him you were saving up for a family treat in the summer.'
'I can't ask Walter for the money, but maybe there's another way ...'

Excerpt: Dreaming of America: A Journey of Betrayal by Glenis Stott
After dinner on the following Tuesday, Clara sent the girls down to Bertha's for the afternoon. She'd thought of keeping them there for 'protection' but didn't want them to see or hear anything.
As soon as they'd left the house she went up to her bedroom, moved the bed to one side and pulled up a loose floorboard to her secret hiding place. She took out a small bundle wrapped in one of her old aprons. She stood up and then sat down on the bed. She opened the bundle and looked at the coins inside; she didn't need to count it, she knew exactly how much there was. Ten shillings and sixpence; the emergency savings that no-one, not even Bertha, knew anything about.
Her heart beating loudly she counted out five shillings onto the bed. Then she wrapped the remaining money in the apron, put it back in its hiding place, replaced the floorboard and slid the bed back over.
She put the five shillings in her apron pocket and went back downstairs to do some darning until George, no, Mr Waddington, arrived. She picked up her darning basket and, choosing a pair of Walter's socks, began darning. Her stitches were uneven and too large but at least she was doing something she told herself. At one point she placed the sock back in the basket, went to lock both the front and back doors, hung the keys on their hooks and returned to her darning.
She was on the third sock, one of John's, when she heard the back gate open. Mr Waddington peered through the window, lifting his hand up to shade his eyes. It looked like a salute and Clara wondered if he'd been a military man. Then she realised she'd never know.
She pulled the key off the hook, went into the scullery and closed the door firmly behind her before unlocking and opening the back door. George, Mr Waddington, put one foot on the step as if to enter but she blocked his way.
'Good afternoon, Mr Waddington,' she said in a voice that had as much confidence as she could muster.
'Have I done something wrong, Clara? I came to the back door like you asked. We don't want Mrs Hacking gossiping, do we?'
Clara fished in her apron for the money. One sixpence rolled into the corner and she struggled to pick it out with her trembling fingers. When she had all the money together she took a deep breath and held it out towards him, keeping her hand as still as she could.
'I've got your money here, Mr Waddington. I think you'll find that's right. Five shillings for ten weeks' payments.'
'You don't need to pay me off like this. Let me come in and we'll talk about it.'
She bent out her elbows to block the doorway again and then moved the money back towards him.
'Five shillings for ten weeks' payments. Please don't call again.'
He didn't take the money off her. He tried to fix her eyes with his but she was looking over his shoulder to a damaged brick on the wall.
'Is it because of last week?'
'Five shillings. Here. Please take it.'
'It doesn't need to happen again.'
'It won't happen again because you won't be calling here again. Take it.'
He made no move to take the money. She opened her hand, the money scattered on the floor and she stepped back into the house, locking the door behind her. She rested her back on the door and felt the vibrations through her chest as he knocked, once, twice, three times calling out, 'Clara, Clara.'
She stood there until it went quiet, then went back into the kitchen and looked through the kitchen window. He was on his hands and knees picking up the scattered money. He looked so undignified, crawling about on the dirty floor.


Author Bio:

Excerpt: Dreaming of America: A Journey of Betrayal by Glenis Stott
Glenis live in St Annes, Lancashire with her husband and two black cats. She started writing in 1999 after her daughter died. At first, it helped her deal with the loss but, in time, she began to enjoy writing for its own sake. She has had a variety of jobs, ranging from Radiographer to Information and Advice Worker on a young person's helpline. Now she is retired. In theory, that means more time for writing but it has to be said that she spends a lot of time walking along the beach or drinking lattes in coffee shops with her husband.


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Interview with Alastair Swinnerton


Interview with Alastair Swinnerton


Tell us about your latest book.
It’s a Children’s/Young Adult fantasy novel about an over-medicated fourteen year old boy called Max Tovey who can see the past, like a peripheral overlay on reality. He also has Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and is on medication, for the PTSD, and for his ‘visions’. But the only cause his Doctor can find for the PTSD is a recurring nightmare of fighting alongside his grandfather Percy on a Somerset Hill Fort against Romans and Demons - but Max has never been to Somerset, nor has he ever met Percy. But then he has to go there, for his grandfather’s funeral, when he discovers to his delight and alarm that he’s a time traveller, and that the recurring nightmare is actually a memory of a past that’s been changed – by Percy. And so, alongside a weird and wonderful collection of other time travellers, ancient Kings, giants and battle faeries, Max embarks on a wild ride through West Country history, both real and mythological, to find the legendary Montacute Cross, close the gates to the Underworld, and lift the curse on his family.
Interview with Alastair Swinnerton
What's the best thing about being a writer?
Being able to get the weirdness out of your head.

Where can people find out more about you and your writing?
My animation writing resumé is at www.toonspace.co.uk, but other than that I can be found at www.alastairswinnerton.com. I don’t blog nearly as much as I should, but I just think the world is rather over-full of writers talking about writing, and, seriously, who needs to know what I just had for supper? Sure, J K Rowling gets retweeted at the speed of light about everything from politics to the rugby scores, but then she is a goddess, and I’m not. Not that I would be a goddess – oh, you know what I mean...

Who is you favorite character in your book and why?

My main character, Max, because he is in many ways me. That sounds a bit up myself, but in defining his character I got to explore his Dyspraxia and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Dyspraxia is little known as a condition, and until a family member was diagnosed with it, I had no idea it existed. But when I started reading up on it, I realized that was completely me. When I was young it was just known as ‘clumsy, shy and having a sieve for a brain’, but now it has a name. It’s part of the autism spectrum, and the main symptoms are extreme social awkwardness, the inability to filter your thoughts for weirdness before they come out of your mouth, and a problem with short-term memory – the ‘in one ear and out the other’ syndrome. Obviously most teenagers have that, but with Dyspraxia, it’s actually a physical thing, in that there’s a problem with the hippocampus, the part of the brain that translates short term memories into long term ones. Max has all of the above in spades, as did I when I was his age, before I began to learn coping mechanisms.

But he also has PTSD, which in a teenager can have catastrophic psychological effects. His stems from what turns out to be a real memory of fighting for his life alongside his grandfather when he was ten, until his grandfather went back in time, and changed the past so that the episode never happened. But Max still has nightmares about it, as, it turns out, do many of the other people involved. My own PTSD doesn’t have quite such dramatic origins, and I won’t go into what caused it, but suffice to say I know all about the panic attacks, the startling at sudden noises and the fear of leaving even your room let alone your comfort zone that Max has had ever since what is known as ‘the incident’. Almost as soon as I’d created Max as a character, long before I had the plot for the book, I knew he had to have these traits, and in many ways they actually informed the plot of the book, which for me was very interesting, letting my character’s problems define the way the story played out.

Why do you think readers are going to enjoy your book?

I hope they will think it’s a ‘rip-roaring ride through time’ as one reviewer put it, but I also hope they will identify with Max as he battles with his problems, and ultimately, if not defeats them, then at least finds a way to cope with them. Mostly I hope they will feel that I’ve created something a little different, not just mixing sci-fi with fantasy, but also putting a hero in the middle of it all who plainly doesn’t want to be a hero, but who ultimately accepts that he has to be if he’s ever going to sort his life out.

Where can a reader purchase your book?





Or just go into your local book store and get them to order it!
                                                      
How do you research your books?

Almost entirely by reading up on the subject, and a lot of staring out of windows and thinking. I spent a long time researching this one – it was probably two years or so before I actually started writing. Local mythology and legends, the real history of Ham Hill itself, and of the Inn that’s at the centre of it, then wider into general Celtic myths and legends, just making sure I got my facts right before the writing began. I have an electronic bookshelf like you wouldn’t believe – god bless archive.org!

Interview with Author Alastair Swinnerton #AuthorInterview #BooksWhat is your work in progress? Tell us about it.

The as yet unnamed sequel. Nine months have passed since the end of the first book, and (spoiler alert!) Max and his best friend Myvi are no closer to finding the Montacute Cross, or the crosses of Arimathea’s disciples that must be found first – it’s like Time has hidden them all. And then, at the beginning of book two, they find themselves at the Battle of Hastings, rescuing an injured King Harold, who, until moments before they got to him, had one of the crosses around his neck...

What books or authors have most influenced your life?

I was a big fantasy and sci-fi reader when I was young – Tolkein of course, and C S Lewis, but also Moorcock, Asimov, Philip K Dick, and later the legends that were Douglas Adams and Terry Pratchett. But more than any of those, this book was probably most influenced by an early literary love of mine, Alan Garner, and especially his books ‘The Weirdstone of Brisingamen’ and ‘The Moon of Gomrath’. I loved the way he brought myth and legend into ordinary places, mixing the ordinary with the extraordinary if you like. When I started working this book out, and decided it had to be set around Ham Hill, I really wanted to try to do with my beloved hill fort what he had done with his own beloved Alderley Edge in Cheshire.

When you’re not writing, how do you spend your time?

How do you mean, when I’m not writing...?


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